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Victorian

circa 1870
A beautiful gold and Scottish hardstone bulla-style opening locket fringed pendant.
£4,500.00
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Description

Details

A beautiful gold and Scottish pebble bulla pendant, c. 1870, the striking pendant of Etruscan-inspired 'bulla' design centred on a flower motif with gold bead centre surrounded by six lobes of various hardstones in different colours including agate, bloodstone and jasper, set within a decorative border of inlaid hardstones and ornate engraving surmounted by a similarly decorated large hinged bale, opening to reveal a round glazed panel and with three articulated drops suspended beneath.
Specifications
  • OriginUnited Kingdom
  • Gemstones and Other MaterialsAgate, bloodstone and jasper
  • Condition ReportExtremeley fine condition
  • Setting18ct yellow gold
  • Weight description30 grams
  • Dimensions6cm long and 3.6cm wide
Directors notes
The fashion for jewellery set with Scottish hardstones began in the mid 19th Century and owes much to Queen Victoria. Her love of Scotland is well documented and after buying Balmoral in 1852 her visits became more frequent. She owned and wore various items of what is frequently referred to as ‘Scottish pebble jewellery’ some of which she commissioned herself from stones she had personally collected. The wide range of colours and patterns found in the opaque gemstones native to Scotland made them ideal for use in a wide range of styles and produced some very attractive jewellery that is widely collected today.